On Political Surveys

Three months ago, I received a survey from the Heritage Foundation. They wanted input on how I (or rather, “Ms. Allyn Gibson,” as that was how the survey was addressed) felt about taxes. Specifically, they wanted to know how I felt about the sunseting of the Bush tax cuts over the next two years.

I answered the survey. I mailed it back. I expected that my answers, which largely were in support of allowing the Bush tax cuts to sunset (because the damn things shouldn’t have been passed in the first place, and a big part of the reason for today’s financial mess is the Bush tax cuts), were not to the Heritage Foundation’s liking. But I didn’t really care what they thought.

Imagine my surprise when, this week, I got the exact same survey in the mail. Same Heritage Foundation, same ten questions, same appeal for donations.

Yeah, well, if they sent me mailing labels, I might’ve considered the donation.

Oh, who am I kidding? I wouldn’t give the Heritage Foundation money.

I also got a survey from the Republican National Committee.

Yes, Michael Steele sent me a survey. No, not the former bassist for the Bangles. The other one. The crazy one.

Apparently, I am a “grassroots Republican,” which is why Steele wants my input. The “liberal media elites and the Obama-Democrats” want me to “desert your Party.”

Well, Michael, I don’t know how to break this to you, but this Teddy Roosevelt Republican hasn’t deserted the Party, but the Party has deserted him.

I do think it’s a bit hypocritical of Steele to write that “The RNC will make sure the Democrats OWN their record now that they are in total control of the federal government,” when I don’t see Republicans owning up to the wreckage they left in the wake of their “total control of the federal government” during the previous administration.

Steele writes: “We are going to get back to basics, rebuild from the grassroots up and come back with renewed energy and a strong commitment to conservative principles of low taxes, small government, personal responsibility and a strong national defense.”

I guess, Michael, my question for you is this — the Republican Party’s principles seem all to be things that they’re against. But what are Republicans today for? Because you then write: “The Democrats will have to offer the nation more than just pessimism and attacks on Republicans.” But the Democrats are offering more than those; they’re offering solutions to problems like health care access and climate change, President Obama is wrestling with how to wind down two wars and end our torture regime. In other words, I see them offering solutions, not problems, and certainly not pessimism.

Suffice it to say, this Teddy Roosevelt Republican filled out his survey and is mailing it back on Monday.

The Republican National Committee didn’t send me mailing labels, either, which means no donation for them. :h2g2:

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