On the PlayStation 3

Sony unveiled the PlayStation 3 last night, their latest salvo in the video game wars.


The use of the Spider-Man movie font on the system console is kinda cool. The XBox 360 has a plain, Arial-esque font, while the PS2 has that nifty, angular Spider-Man font. I like. 🙂

The initial report says a spring release. On past experience I would expect that for Japan, with an American release three to six months later.

Just what I need–another game console system in the house. 🙂

9 thoughts on “On the PlayStation 3

  1. Just what I need–another game console system in the house

    Good thing I’m around to help you out then! Just wrap up that old nasty PS2 and a copy of Kingdom Hearts and pop down to your local UPS store! 😎

  2. Crap. They did redesign the controller. Now I’m not sure which to buy if Revolution falls out from under me…. (Less likely, given that the backwards compatibility was promised—but still possible. Especially since I would love to know how a slotloading drive can handle the smaller discs. :roll:)

  3. The controller looks not at all as I thought it would. Rumor had it that the directional pad and the left thumbstick would be switched, much as they are on the XBox controller.

    Curiously, the new PS3 controller looks a lot like a third-party PS1 controller that was sold about seven or eight years ago. I always called it the Boomerang, because that’s what it looked like, a blue Boomerang.

  4. Well, they still have time to switch the two if they want to. On the other hand, if they’re keeping backwards compatiblity with PS2 and PS1—something that’ll probably be really important to them after Nintendo’s promise of compatibility back to NES games, albeit requiring repurchasing them.

    (Great idea, poor execution. I’d rather see a battery-powered, wireless cartridge reader sold separately for each format—or maybe one AC-powered unit, still wireless, for NES, SNES, and N64. Especially if said unit included an N64 controller port and under-the-controller-slot-thingie, and GameCube controller ports, allowing you to use stuff like the microphones, bongos, Game Boy game connector for N64, and Game Boy Advance cable for GC. But that might be asking too much.)

  5. Oops. That should’ve read “if they’re keeping backwards compatibility… requiring repurchasing them—keeping the pad/stick in the same place is probably better.”

  6. Revolution is going to be backwards compatible with NES games?

    Jeez louise!

    People can’t get enough of the retro games discs available for the various platforms. Namco Museum and the first Midway Arcade Treasures seem to be the two big sellers. Nintendo has such a back catalog that I’ve often wondered why they didn’t do a disc of their NES classics for the GameCube. Twenty games, price it at twenty dollars, and people would buy the GameCube just for that. People who never gave the GameCube a second look would buy a system if they could play the original Mario or Donkey Kong.

    Instead, Nintendo sells them on the GameBoy Advance for fifteen to thirty dollars a pop. Kids don’t know better, and adults who grew up with these games don’t want to play them on a hand-held.

    Sometimes I have to wonder what Nintendo is thinking. Common sense isn’t their strong suit.

  7. Revolution is going to be backwards compatible with NES games?

    Yep. I’m wondering why there’s no Game Boy/GBC support, though— even though they can be played in the most recent iteration of the system, you can’t buy the older games anymore.

    Namco Museum and the first Midway Arcade Treasures seem to be the two big sellers.

    I love MAT. Paperboy‘s where it’s at. 😉 (Need to get MAT2 for Gauntlet II at some point….)

    Nintendo has such a back catalog that I’ve often wondered why they didn’t do a disc of their NES classics for the GameCube.

    They had a decent amount of NES games available on GameCube, the problem being that they were scattered about on three different discs, two of which required you to finish (or play a significant amount of) the game to continue. But yes, a compilation would’ve been nice. I mean, all they would have needed to code was the menu, since the emulator was already created for Animal Crossing. 😕

    People who never gave the GameCube a second look would buy a system if they could play the original Mario or Donkey Kong.

    Well, second Mario. 😉

    Instead, Nintendo sells them on the GameBoy Advance for fifteen to thirty dollars a pop. Kids don’t know better, and adults who grew up with these games don’t want to play them on a hand-held.

    Okay, I’m inbetween those age groups, but I wouldn’t mind playing them on a handheld; heck, the GBC version of SMB is where I first actually beat the game. The thing is, I don’t want to pay $20 for the games, especially when I can play them on my GameCube easily enough for free. (Says the one who bought all four Super Mario Advance games at $30 each….)

    Now, $4 each, for the eReader versions? That I’d be willing to pay, despite the minor hassle of barcode swiping (I’m kinda disappointed that Nintendo dropped support for the eReader with no warning. 😥 They had some nice ideas, like releasing additional SMA4 levels….)

    Sometimes I have to wonder what Nintendo is thinking. Common sense isn’t their strong suit.

    Remember, this is the company who thought that its customers didn’t care about playing online. Or playing DVDs. Now, what features were added to the DS and Revolution again? 😛

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *