A Triple Parody

An anonymous triple parody, from the Bridgeport (Connecticut) Evening Farmer, January 29, 1910, though it can be found in other newspapers across the country at about the same time. Sheer-Luck Blake The modern Sexton Blake climbed through the kitchen window, followed by his faithful ally, Bunny–or was it Watson? “Ah,” exclaimed Blake, surveying the surroundings. … Continue reading A Triple Parody

A Perceptive Sherlockian of 1900

While doing some genealogical research in old newspapers — see here — I came across this fascinating piece in the Baltimore Sun of October 26, 1900, copied from the New Orleans Times-Democrat. It’s not just fans of today’s media, like Marvel Comics films and HBO prestige dramas and comic books, speculating about what’s next for … Continue reading A Perceptive Sherlockian of 1900

A Vintage Peanuts Cookbook

Somehow I’ve become the kind of person who buys vintage cookbooks. In the spring, shortly after the COVID shutdown began, I bought a cookbook from 1912 published in conjunction with Washington, DC’s Heurich Brewery. At the end of July, I bought another cookbook through eBay, this one a Peanuts-themed Chex cereal cookbook published in 1991. … Continue reading A Vintage Peanuts Cookbook

The Misadventures of Sherlock Holmes: Making an eBook

Throughout January I worked, off and on, on something of a private project, to make an ebook of Ellery Queen’s long-out-of-print anthology, The Misadventures of Sherlock Holmes. An anthology of Sherlock Holmes parodies, sprinkled with a few genuine pastiches and two play scripts, essentially a survey of non-Doyle Sherlock Holmes literature to mid-century, The Misadventures … Continue reading The Misadventures of Sherlock Holmes: Making an eBook

The Coldest December

On December 6, 1917, two ships collided in Halifax, Nova Scotia’s harbor. One of the ships, the Mont-Blanc, carrying munitions en route to Europe, caught fire and, shortly after 9 o’clock local time, the cargo exploded, laying waste to the city and surrounding communities, killing (officially) two thousand and injuring nearly 10,000 more, in what’s … Continue reading The Coldest December

The Cathedral of Fear

If the first book in Alessandro Gatti’s Sherlock, Lupin & Me series, The Dark Lady was the secret origin (ie., how they met) of the adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Irene Adler, and Arsène Lupin as teenagers, the next two (The Soprano’s Last Song and The Mystery of the Scarlet Rose) are in the main Sherlock … Continue reading The Cathedral of Fear

Anne of Green Gables, in Gaelic

Saturday morning, while browsing Facebook, I found an interested an unexpected article — Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables is being translated into Scots Gaelic. The Canadian dialect of Gaelic was spoken on Prince Edward Island, though in declining numbers, at the time Montgomery’s novels were set, and I did not know that Montgomery … Continue reading Anne of Green Gables, in Gaelic

The Scarlet Rose

A few months ago, I wrote about The Dark Lady, the first book in Alesandro Gatti’s young adult mystery series, Sherlock, Lupin, and I, about the adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Arsène Lupin, and Irene Adler when they were children. I enjoyed it — it was more fun and inspired than I expected — and I … Continue reading The Scarlet Rose

Arsene Lupin vs. Herlock Sholmes

Over the last several months, Standard Ebooks has released nicely made, free ebooks of the Holmes canon, except only The Casebook because it’s not in the public domain yet in the United States. They’ve also released several books of Maurice Leblanc’s Arsène Lupin, gentleman burglar, and since I was unfamiliar with the character (save for … Continue reading Arsene Lupin vs. Herlock Sholmes